Part 1. What is social emotional competencence?
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 2. Positive social and emotional climates
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 3. Learning about and managing emotions
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 4. Social competence
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 5. Developing self-regulation and executive function
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 6. Neurodivergence and social-emotional competence
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 7. Challenging behaviour and social-emotional skills
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 8. Conclusion
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.

Welcome

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Welcome to the first part of the course. In this part, we provide you with a general overview of social and emotional competence, and the range of interconnected capacities and skills involved. As we progress through the course, we will revisit each of the components of social and emotional competence in greater detail, and look at specific contexts and challenges related to developing social and emotional competence.

The aims for this part of the course are: 
  • To understand and reflect upon the importance of social and emotional competence
  • To become familiar with the different terminology used to describe the different components of social and emotional competence
This will involve:
  1. Reading an introduction to social and emotional competence
  2. Reflecting on children’s social and emotional competencies in your own setting
  3. Watching a video in which Professor Sir Peter Gluckman explains why the development of social and emotional competence in early childhood is so important
  4. Considering the social and emotional competencies you use on a given day

There are opportunities to share your practices and priorities relating to social and emotional competence, and learn from your fellow course participants, on our online boards. We also provide a list of links to further reading should you wish to pursue these introductory ideas around social and emotional competence further. Additionally, you can write your ideas and responses in a workbook as you make your way through the course. When you reach the end of the course, you can download the workbook with all of your responses and take it back to your centre with you.  

Watch
Transcript

Kia ora, ko Vicki Hargraves ahau, and welcome to this course on social and emotional competence in early childhood education. Many children have difficulty with social and emotional skills, and when they do, this can lead to problems with learning, but also problems with challenging behaviours. Perhaps they may have no friends, and they may be rejected by their peers, and receive very little in the way of positive attention from teachers. And all of this can lead to a poor sense of self-esteem. 

Without appropriate support these children can flounder in educational settings, and when they go to school, there may be not as much support for social and emotional learning. 

One of my own children has struggled with learning social and emotional competencies, and this has got me really interested in coming to understand what it is that children need to learn, and how they learn it, and what we do if they don’t pick it up naturally. So, in this course we’re going to have a look at the neurological aspects of social and emotional competence, and this is really important because it offers some really clear guidance around the kinds of supports we can offer children.

Self-regulation is a really hot topic here, and for good reason, because the ability to regulate, or to control and manage our responses to our thoughts and emotions, is crucial across a number of life activities, and also really important in learning, when we’re trying to navigate difficult situations as we’re trying to learn a new skill, and that involves lots of social interaction, perhaps, but also dealing with some tricky emotions that come up for us as we’re learning new skills.

However, teaching social and emotional competence is a little bit different to teaching counting, or teaching how to mix colours, for example. It requires that we have really strong relationships with children, that we really know our children well, but also that we have an understanding of what social and emotional competencies look like and how they develop, so that we can offer just the right type of support at the right time for children to help them learn.

Let’s get started! I’m really wishing you a great experience with this course. Ka kite.

As you have heard, I feel strongly about the importance of social and emotional learning in effective early childhood education and I believe it is a crucial component that supports children’s learning and wellbeing. So let’s get started by looking at social and emotional competence in a little more depth.