Introduction
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 1. Introducing the visual arts
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 2. Introducing the role of the teacher
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This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 3. Exploring the role of the teacher
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 4. The visual arts in an inquiry approach
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 5. Developing inquiry through the visual arts
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 6. Environments and materials for the visual arts
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 7. Using materials intentionally in the visual arts
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
Part 8. Integrating visual arts into everyday teaching and learning
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.
End of course
This lesson will be available on April 1, 2024.

Apply and consolidate

Need help?
Relate your learning to practice

Thinking about the activity you have just completed with children, try to make a list of the working theories that children were exploring (for a guide to recognising and identifying working theories, see here). These might be working theories about the topic, or about how to approach the task.

Note that even when children share their opinions and perspectives, these are often informed by working theories. For example, in relation to the examples of choosing what to wear to a wedding, children might say or be thinking ‘you must wear your favourite outfit to a wedding’. In relation to designing a playground for birds, they might say ‘birds won’t want monkey bars because they don’t have arms’. Working theories can also be spotted (or at least guessed at) in the actions of infants and toddlers. 

Whether you completed the first activity for older children or the second activity for infants and toddlers, in this activity you will document some of the visual artwork created and what you observed. Think about the large printed photos and transcribed words of children that were displayed at Kids’ Domain, and how, for the teachers, these displays served as an invitation for further engagement by the children initially involved, but also for others in the community (other children, teachers and families).

Plan how you will share this documentation when it is completed.

Which artwork would you display? Share below one piece and explain what it generated.

Summary

The important points to take away from this part are: 

  • The Reggio Emilia approach and its focus on projects, inquiry, a relationship with expressive materials, collaboration, dialogue, and documentation may serve as inspiration for an inquiry approach using the visual arts.
  • Children’s inquiry is paralleled by the inquiry of teachers as they explore how children are thinking and what experiences might best support the development of that thinking. 
Further reading

Read Margaret Brook’s paper about the importance of drawing for facilitating young children’s thinking and meaning-making, and in particular, how children can use drawing to explore and develop concepts.