Research suggests that appropriate, constructive and assessment-based feedback is one of the most critical features of effective teaching and learning. However, not all feedback is created equal.

How often does your feedback include the following features:

Rarely Sometimes Often
Goal-referenced – linked to, and assisting understanding of, the goals of learning
Matched to the needs of the students, with the level of support they need
Accurate and trustworthy (with teachers and students in agreement about what counts as success)
Carefully timed, provided when students need it to improve learning (which might be during the learning activity, or before revising a piece of work)
Addresses strengths and weaknesses as well as revealing what students understand and misunderstand, and accompanied with strategies to help the student improve
Addresses correct rather than incorrect responses, and building on changes from previous attempts or understandings
Guides ongoing learning
Directed towards enhanced self-efficacy and more effective self-regulation
Conversational (either written or oral) rather than one-way
Used in conjunction with self and/or peer assessment
Does not threaten self-esteem
Checked for clarity, adequacy, and effectiveness with the student – does this feedback help?
Actionable – with the student given time in which to respond to and act on feedback
Focuses on effort rather than success

 

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