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ECE webinar: Intentional teaching and investigations; Daisies part two

Back by popular demand, Dr Anne Meade and Meg Kwan from Daisies Early Education and Care Centre follow up their hugely successful webinar on designing local curriculum responsive to their individual context. In this webinar, Anne and Meg discuss how they utilise an intentional teaching approach in the planning and implementation of their investigations with children. The webinar explores examples of investigations undertaken at Daisies, what has made them successful, and how teachers have balanced extended learning with children’s free play. Anne and Meg also have put together a useful written guide on how they approach curriculum planning, which provides greater detail on many of the ideas discussed in this webinar. 

We’ve also put together a written summary of the key ideas discussed in the webinar.

Watch the video of the first webinar now.

To help you navigate the webinar easily, there is a list of the key topics covered in the session below, including the time each was discussed.

You can also read our insight article exploring key ideas from the webinar.

2m17sWhat does the term intentional teaching mean?
6m36sWhy use investigations
10m55s How do investigations support teachers to be intentional? An example
23m55sThe systems that underpin teaching through investigations
28m40sWeaving in the learning outcomes of Te Whāriki
31m20sDocumenting investigations
33m41sSharing planning with families
36m45sLife worthy investigations
39m28sEnsuring investigation suits all children’s interests
41m56sMixed age settings and investigations
43m43sIs it important to incorporate every child’s learning needs/goals in the investigation?
46m49sEncourage kaiako to embrace collaborative work
49m10sConcluding comments


Questions for exploring the key ideas from this webinar further:

  • What do you understand by the term “intentional teaching”? Can you give an example of being intentional from your own teaching practice? 
  • What kind of comments or unusual play actions or interests have you noticed that might be used to provoke an investigation? How would you frame this idea as a question?
  • How might intentional teaching be used to motivate, sustain and extend an investigation?
  • How might you recognise a “wow” moment? What might a “wow” moment look like for your setting?
  • How might you be creative about finding time for two or more teachers to plan together for intentional teaching through an investigation?
  • How might you define “life-worthy investigations” in your setting?
  • Further resources to explore these ideas: